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The 12 tombs discovered included animal and juvenile remains. Image courtesy: Lund University.
The 12 tombs discovered included animal and juvenile remains. Image courtesy: Lund University.

More tombs discovered on ancient site

Excavations at an ancient sandstone site in Egypt have unearthed up to a dozen tombs.

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of young persons, sheep and crocodiles in 12 new tombs at the site.

The thrilling discovery also revealed rock-cut tombs with chambers and crypts cut into rocks and niches that may have been used for offerings.

According to information released by Sweden’s Lund University, the archaeological material discovered historically correlates with the reigns of Thutmosis III and Amenhotep II.

In addition to the architecture of the ancient quarry site, the excavation revealed a wealth of culture, including finely dressed sarcophagi, sculptured and painted pottery coffins, textiles and ceramic vessels and plates. The discovery also unearthed an array of jewellery, amulets and scarabs.

Furthermore, preliminary studies on the vast amount of human remains recovered from the necropolis indicated generally healthy individuals, providing fascinating insight into a once thriving civilisation.

As previously reported by Quarry, the foundation and remains of the temple were previously unearthed by a Swedish-led group of archaeologists undertaking research at the Gebel el Silsila quarry, located outside the city of Aswan, Egypt.

The foundations of the temple were positioned on the eastern bank of the Nile River and measured approximately 35m by 18m. This included four layers, column bases, and inner and outer walls.

The Swedish group, led by Doctor Maria Nilsson and John Ward from Lund University, emphasised the importance of the discovery. They said the new find adds exciting new components to the necropolis, changing yet again the perceived function and apparent appearance to the site of Gebel el Silsila.

The Gebel el Silsila quarry is believed to have supplied stone to construct many of the temples in southern Egypt, including the Luxor temple.

More reading
Egyptian temple discovered in ancient quarry 
Dig site yields ancient quarry carvings
Archaeologists uncover world’s largest quarried stone
Water solves Egyptian puzzle
Ancient quarries unearth riddle of temple city











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Tuesday, 15 October, 2019 3:05am
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