Search Stories by: 
&/or
 

Load & Haul, Supplier News













The first tractor manufactured at the John Deere Dubuque Tractor Works, circa March 1947 and a John Deere 644K wheel loader close to assembly.
The first tractor manufactured at the John Deere Dubuque Tractor Works, circa March 1947 and a John Deere 644K wheel loader close to assembly.

From blacksmith to international corporate citizen

In March this year, a group of Australians from the extractive and construction materials industry toured two John Deere factories in America’s Midwest. Jim Hankins reports on the growth of a Midwest company that spans three centuries
and is recognised around the world.

John Deere, like most industrial complexes, started from humble beginnings. A blacksmith dealing with the farmers of America’s Midwest developed a better plough blade. The blade proved so popular it eventually led to the company’s expansion into other fields and its evolution into mobile machinery. 

The linkages of a loader during assembly.
The linkages of a loader during assembly.

John Deere, like most industrial complexes, started from humble beginnings. A blacksmith dealing with the farmers of America’s Midwest developed a better plough blade. The blade proved so popular it eventually led to the company’s expansion into other fields and its evolution into mobile machinery. 

Today, John Deere is a modern manufacturer with production and service facilities across the globe, covering an enormous range of equipment across a diverse range of industries.

Having started operations in 1837 in Grand Detour, Illinois, John Deere moved to Moline, Illinois in 1848.1 The worldwide corporate headquarters of John Deere is still in Moline today. The Davenport and Dubuque factories of the John Deere group are both located across the Mississippi River, in Iowa.  

The Dubuque works opened in 1947 and, with a number of upgrades and improvements since then, is now a modern, efficient factory producing crawler bulldozers, crawler loaders, backhoes, tracked harvesters, tracked fell bunchers, knuckleboom loaders and skid steer loaders.

Some of the numerous engines assembled on-site.
Some of the numerous engines assembled on-site.

The Dubuque works opened in 1947 and, with a number of upgrades and improvements since then, is now a modern, efficient factory producing crawler bulldozers, crawler loaders, backhoes, tracked harvesters, tracked fell bunchers, knuckleboom loaders and skid steer loaders.

The Davenport works was set up some time later, starting production in 1974. It now produces articulated dump trucks, four-wheel-drive loaders, motor graders, felling heads, wheeled feller bunchers, log skidders and cabs.2 All equipment is made to order; dealers may choose to carry stock but Deere manufactures to orders only.

Deere has numerous manufacturing facilities around the world, including some joint ventures with Hitachi, producing hydraulic excavators for various markets. In Australia, Hitachi Construction Machinery (Australia) is the dealer for John Deere, as well as the Bell line from South Africa.

GREEN MACHINE “REVOLUTION”
The accompanying photos illustrate the diversity of manufacturing skills and capabilities at each of the sites visited.

With an extensive product range in the lawn and turf industry, it is only natural that John Deere sponsors a major golf tournament. The John Deere Classic is held each year in July at the TPC Deere Run course in Silvis, Illinois, not far from the Moline headquarters. Aussies frequently account for the highest number of non-American players.

Most municipal bodies or councils in Australia would have some type of John Deere equipment, ranging from ride-on mowers to tractors. While the green machines are widely recognised in this area, a quiet revolution has been taking place in earthmoving. From graders to front end loaders, John Deere equipment is becoming more prominent across the country and across the globe. 

From fashioning a steel plough in the 19th century to being a multinational company in the 21st century, covering an enormous range of industries, with prod











ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jim Hankins
Managing Director • Rivergum Industries

Jim Hankins is the Managing Director of Rivergum Industries, and holds a degree in Mining Engineering. Jim is the Chairman for the Institute of Quarrying Australia – NSW Branch.
Quarry Magazine
advertisement








Wednesday, 18 September, 2019 9:03am
login to my account
Username: Password:
Skyscraper 1
advertisement
Free Sign Up

Receive FREE newsletter and alerts


CONNECT WITH US
Display 2 dupe
advertisement
Skyscraper 1
advertisement