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The truck being measured simply drives underneath the scan head and the LVS system does the rest.
The truck being measured simply drives underneath the scan head and the LVS system does the rest.

Supplier offers new solution to payload management

Loadscan has entered the Australian market with the trade certification of its Load Volume Scanner (LVS) measurement system. 
After a long intensive process to achieve certification (Loadscan was the first company to achieve it in Australia), the company anticipates steady growth in sales and rental over the next two years with the intention to build a long term relationship with a diverse range of industries throughout Australia, including sand mining, quarries and civil construction.

Any company that buys, sells and carts bulk material by truck and trailer will appreciate load management solutions that complete the puzzle of accounting for bulk materials moved in the above industries.

The LVS is a fast, accurate, cost-effective and low maintenance measurement system, with no moving parts and thanks to the non-contact nature of the measurement process, the system is relatively maintenance-free. The truck being measured simply drives underneath the scan head and the LVS system does the rest. Loadscan employs the best quality components so that customers can enjoy accurate load measurements and data that they can rely on all year round.

The company is often asked: “Why measure by cubic volume instead of weight?” The answer is simple: Why not when cubic volume is the most commonly tendered measurement for payment of bulk quantities traded, whether it be in civil construction, overburden stripping or bulk product deliveries?

CONVERSION FACTORS
To understand the advantages of load volume scanning compared to weighing systems is not simply a question of one or the other because in some cases the two systems are complimentary. For example, a civil construction customer orders a tendered 60,000m3 quantity of product. 

Before the product is carted to the site by on-road truck and dog, the cartage company needs to be sure that its trucks are carting the right weights to be legally on the road, so all loads are sold over the weighbridge.

Any company that buys, sells and carts aggregate will appreciate load management solutions that more accurately account for bulk materials.
Any company that buys, sells and carts aggregate will appreciate load management solutions that more accurately account for bulk materials.
For the customer and the quarry to work out how many cubic metres of product is supplied, a baseline conversion factor will be used for the job which may run for six months.

Conversion factors can be dramatically influenced by a range of factors throughout the duration of the contract. If the product in question is subject to environmental conditions like rain or dry spells or varying rock densities, the volume converted from the weight of the product will vary, this can be +/- 1-20% which simply isn’t acceptable in tough economic conditions. 

Within the quarry environment, this sort of variance can be detrimental when accounting for the production and inventory of product processed and stockpiled. The contract requires a specified 60,000m3 quantity of product, you are awarded to the contract to supply so you set out to produce the right amount of product for the contract. The laboratory samples and tests the rock to establish a density, eg 1.55mt - 1m3 of 20mm road base = 1.55mt. As mentioned above, during the six months of production weather conditions change from very hot and dry to a wet spell, so now the product densities change as the moisture contents fluctuate. 

Consequently the belt scale is out of calibration, the truck scale is giving readings that don’t seem to match up and the information you have received tells you that you have processed 93,000mt - 60,000m3 being the right amount of product for the contract. The stockpile has been carted to the customer but the customer still requires another 5455m3. They check the survey and it is determined that not enough material has been supplied and a dispute arises over a discrepancy of 10 per cent  in the actual conversion factor.

When a Loadscan total load management solution is used to account for the aggregate produced, carted to the stockpile and delivered to the customer, the quarry operator would know day to day production rates and could also calculate the cost of production and overall operational efficiencies. Accurately stockpiled inventory and supplied quantity balances at the end of each month make stocktake much easier. 

This is all achieved by integrating the LVS measurement system with the Loadscan Overview reporting software which allows for a simple paperless load data analysis and more efficient reporting.

The other advantages of using the Loadscan system is that it is easily portable when trailer-mounted. For remote crushing contracts, the LVS can be installed within 90 minutes and operational with no cost-prohibitive site works required.

Source: Loadscan Ltd

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Friday, 20 September, 2019 10:33pm
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