Search Stories by: 
&/or
 

News, Industry News, Geology Talk














Slag selected from Australian Steel Mill Services' site has been used in Jamie North’s Rock Melt exhibit.
Slag selected from Australian Steel Mill Services' site has been used in Jamie North’s Rock Melt exhibit.

Aggregate to ‘rock’ art exhibit

Recycled construction material and aggregate will heavily feature in an upcoming art exhibit that explores the dynamic between industry and nature.

Rock Melt, created by Sydney-based artist Jamie North, consists of six columns up to 5m in height constructed from recycled slag and concrete and entwined with native flora.

The slag – a by-product of smelting iron ore – was hand-selected by North from Australian Steel Mill Services’ site in Port Kembla, New South Wales. “I was mostly interested in slag with high porosity,” he told Quarry.

Once he had obtained his materials, North tumbled large pieces of slag in a cement mixer in order to remove the sharp edges and to create “a more weathered look” before core drilling each piece and threading them onto a steel armature. Slag “sand” and 20mm slag aggregate was also combined with cement supplied by Boral Cement to produce a concrete mix.

“The work is formed as a ‘negative sculpture’ with the large aggregates that I want exposed on the surface held in place with clay,” North explained. “The concrete mix is then poured into this negative mould, stripped when cured and then blasted with water at high pressure.”

It was said that Rock Melt, a commission for the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV), was inspired by native flora growing from mortar cracks in buildings and the aesthetics of mineral extraction and industrial waste.

“[Rock Melt explores] the relationship between nature and architecture, decay and regeneration and the traditions of cultivated gardens,” an NGV media release stated.

“[It] brings nature inside the walls of NGV,” NGV director Tony Ellwood added. “North’s work elicits an elegant dialogue between the natural and the industrial. These sculptures look ancient, like ruins, an especially clever effect given that the sculptures are in fact modelled from a by-product of an industrial process.”

North has also used other quarry products in his past work, including limestone and marble waste.

Rock Melt will be on display in NGV International’s Federation Court from 27 March to 13 July, 2015.
 

Art from aggregate

North tumbled slag in a cement mixer to prepare it for use in Rock Melt.
North tumbled slag in a cement mixer to prepare it for use in Rock Melt.
Slag was core drilled before being threaded onto steel armature.
Slag was core drilled before being threaded onto steel armature.
North’s 2014 work, The Inconstant Ones, incorporated marble waste and limestone.
North’s 2014 work, The Inconstant Ones, incorporated marble waste and limestone.

More reading
Sculptors get creative with quarried sand




















Wednesday, 18 July, 2018 10:58am
login to my account
Username: Password:
Free Sign Up

Receive FREE newsletter and alerts


CONNECT WITH US
standardlarge_0618
advertisement
standardlarge_0518
advertisement
standardlarge_02185
advertisement