Search Stories by: 
&/or
 

News, International News

Articles from CRUSHERS PLANT & EQUIPMENT (646 Articles), SCREENING PLANT & EQUIPMENT (579 Articles), OH&S - EQUIPMENT & SERVICES (241 Articles)

A government survey has shown that crushed stone and gravel from a quarry near the ill-fated Fukushima nuclear plant may have been radioactive when it was shipped out for use in housing and infrastructure.
A government survey has shown that crushed stone and gravel from a quarry near the ill-fated Fukushima nuclear plant may have been radioactive when it was shipped out for use in housing and infrastructure.
 











Irradiated concrete spooks Fukushima residents

Japan’s national and local government authorities have urged calm after they revealed at least 60 and possibly up to 100 dwellings and buildings may have been constructed with concrete from radiation-contaminated crushed stone that was quarried near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Approximately 5725 tonnes of crushed stone and gravel were shipped from a quarry in Namie, Fukushima Prefecture between the start of the triple meltdown crisis triggered by the 11 March, 2011 earthquake and tsunami and 12 April last year when Namie was designated as part of the nuclear exclusion zone.

A government survey has shown that crushed stone and gravel from the Namie quarry, after being processed into concrete, was used to build 60 houses and condominiums in Fukushima and on other infrastructure such as roads and river dikes at nearly 1000 locations in the prefecture after the March disasters. This included earthquake resistant materials for a school building and a road pavement leading up to the school gate. The Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry is still investigating the distribution routes used by the 17 aggregate producers that were operating within the evacuation zone.

The contamination threat first came to light when radiation levels of up to 1.24 microsieverts per hour were recorded in an apartment block in Nihonmatsu, Fukushima, about 55km from the nuclear plant. Although the annual radiation exposure for someone living in the building would be 10 microsieverts, half the government-mandated evacuation level of 20 microsieverts, Japan’s chief cabinet secretary Osamu Fujimura decided to proceed with a formal investigation into quarries within the no-go zone and verify if there were similar cases.

To ease the growing public alarm, the Japan Crushed Stone Association has since urged its members in the prefecture to voluntarily submit some of their products to a research facility of the prefectural government for radiation testing.

Source: Asahi Shimbun, Mainichi Japan, The Japan Times, Yahoo (Australia)



















Saturday, 18 November, 2017 05:06pm
login to my account
Username: Password:
Free Sign Up

Receive FREE newsletter and alerts


CONNECT WITH US
deluxe_0516
advertisement
standard_0317
advertisement
standard_0317
advertisement